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Category Archives: Composition

Taking a closer look…

By | Art, Color, Composition | 6 Comments

I just came across this lovely painting, for the first time. It is The Homestead, by John Whorf (American, 1903-1959) and it is a watercolor done in about 1945.

Let’s look at it together, and see what we can see. After my very first glance (“what a beautiful old cape! Oh dear, abandoned…“) I notice that almost half of the painting, in the foreground, is taken up by the soft diagonal of the field. The black of the wellpump stands out from the tans and browns of the grasses. The pump draws my eye right to the house itself. In terms of color, the field has a bit of green and even some yellow in with the tans and browns.

Where does your eye travel when viewing the painting? I looked at the brighter colors of the field first, then the black pump led me to the green back door of the house’s ell, and the roofline. And then my eye goes to the hard shadow line across the house, and to the far door… My eye travelled back to the patch of black in the window just to the left of the white door – a broken window, I think, that adds to the abandoned feel of the house. And from the far door, I took in the boarded-up window on the far right.

It was only on the second looking that I really took in the angles of the roof, the two chimneys, and how the house is framed and softened at the top by the unseen tree’s branches.

Look at how the angle of the shadow falling across the house is as hard a line as the house itself. Look at the shadows from the tree on the top roof and far side of the house. Where is the sun coming from?

Did you notice that the diagonal of the hard shadow-line on the house is just the same as (parallel to) the diagonal of the left-most roofline? How do the different diagonals of the roof itself play off against the soft diagonal of the field?

The green bushes here and there in the field balance the greens of the branches overhead. And the field itself: it puts the house at a distance from us, doesn’t it?

Of course the shape of the house itself – the placement of the doors and windows, the rooflines and horizontal lines of the clapboards – is determined by the architecture of any good old cape. But the artist chose just that angle to view it from, with the sun and shadows falling at just that moment, when he contemplated his choices – his composition.

What is the focal point of the painting? I am not sure, and maybe it is different to different people. But I decided that for me, it was the white door – what I took to be the main door that would be used every day.

The whole abandoned look of the house brings to mind who lived there, why they left it, who went in and out of those doors a hundred times, a thousand times. And, at least for me, that is the emotional impact of the painting. I can so easily picture a woman coming out of that green door of the ell to pump water – for dyeing wool or yarn on the top of her old stove. Don’t you think there might have been a hooked rug in front of the stove?

Each art medium has its own look. Watercolor allows that very softness of color, and the wonderful almost blurry top edge of the field grasses, allowing you to feel you are looking right through the grass where it overlaps the house’s foundation. You could dye wool to get the different colors of the field, but it would be beyond me how to create that soft edge where field and house meet.

John Whorf’s The Homestead (August), c.1945 is being sold by Childs Gallery, Boston, MA for $8,500, and they are online at childsgallery.com.

The Gallery description of the painting reads “John Whorf was one of the most accomplished American watercolorists. In this watercolor he treats a Cape Cod house… with a style and technique reminiscent of two of his favorite artists, John Singer Sargent and Frank W. Benson.”

Whorf was born in Winthrop, MA, and died in Provincetown. I did not find much biographical information on him, but it is clear, after searching, that many galleries actively are interested in finding works by him. And a book has just been published about him, John Whorf Rediscovered, available from AFA Publishing. You can see a few more of his paintings here, all lovely.

Today, don’t look at the eclipse without special precautions, so you can continue to look, and then look again, at everything else.

Ruby in the Garden

By | Composition, Making rugs | 4 Comments

Back in March, I drew out this design, Ruby in the Garden, pretty quickly, since I needed a new rug to work on. At first, it had a butterfly and a second bird in it, but as I finished working on the cat and flowers, decided that they made the composition unbalanced, so left them out. One bird was enough to keep Ruby mesmerized, anyhow!

The only other conscious decision I made about the composition as I drew it out, was to have one of the tulips arch just parallel with the curve of Ruby’s back. I just thought it would, in a subtle way, give her more presence.

The lilac pussywillow flowers were done with the Waldoboro sculpting technique – just enough to add interest, even if you can’t really see it in the photo. And maybe pussywillows are not really lilac, but that’s what seemed right at the time. After I had hooked Ruby and the flowers, I set this rug aside to work on a wide-cut rug for a class I took.

Then about a month ago, I lost Ruby. I had just finished that wide-cut rug, and so a few days later, I pulled out this rug again to finish it. It did help to work on a Ruby rug during those first days of feeling her absence after 15 years. It just worked out that way.

It may not be the last rug I ever make of Ruby, but it will be the last one that has her cat fur embedded in it, from her lying on it from time to time.

May you always have just the right rug to work on, to soothe your soul and raise your spirit, as you go through your days!

Designs right around you

By | Composition, Design, Making rugs | 2 Comments

A few people asked me about this rug I showed (with Ruby gracing it) the other day. So today let’s talk about it a bit. It was one of the rugs that I’ve had the most fun hooking, maybe because I drew it out quite quickly, and only had the most vague idea of how it would end up looking. I couldn’t wait to see how it turned out!

A few years ago, I took a class called “Designing From Nature” with Liz Alpert Fay, up at Shelburne, VT. A three day rughooking class, and none of us ever picked up a hook! We just looked at things and worked on designs. And we talked a bit about techniques to transition a design from drawing-size to full rug size. I came home with at least three full designs on backing, ready to go. And this was the first one I finished hooking.

Liz had asked everyone in the class to come with about 6 or 8 “natural treasures”. We brought little pieces of driftwood, seed pods, flowers, little rocks. And though most of us were not at all experts at drawing, she had us just sit down and sketch out our versions of the natural treasures that struck our fancy.

One thing I brought was a cross-sectioned slice of blue agate that I have kept in a window for more than thirty years. I have always loved seeing the light from the window coming through it, and highlighting the layered rings:

As you can see, the rug only remotely looks like the agate slice. It was just a starting point. One large squiggle for the outside border (without any really sharp curves that would make it hard to finish when the rug was done) and then echoing inner squiggles that varied a bit each time. I tried to vary thicker “layers” and thinner layers. And I remember I ended up changing these a bit as I actually did the hooking.

I did keep to the overall blue coloring of my original agate, but added in some purples and blue textures as I went. As often happens, I picked the colors as I went along, just mindful of getting enough contrast between the “layers” and enough variety overall.

One thing about designing that I learned in this class with Liz: You don’t actually have to try drawing an exact replica of something. Think of it as drawing your own impression of it. A seed pod can become such an interesting form to create an abstract yet natural design!

A handful of shells can suggest forms and shapes to create a design that might end up having nothing directly to do with shells at all:

Can you envision using the lines of this shell photo to make an interesting pattern for a hit or miss rug? There you go!

A branch of a tree, currents in a stream, the curves of a piece of driftwood, or even the cracks in a rock can be the starting point of a lovely rug design.

Look at this simple photo of a tree branch:

Now, try to stop yourself from seeing it as a branch, and look at it just as a form, a series of lines. What if each section of the background was a different color, instead of being all green? Can you start seeing it as a design, maybe a design that will become completely separated from “a branch”, that you could develop into a pleasing rug form?

I just quickly went into an online paint program and came up with this:

It was done quickly to illustrate a point, and nothing beautiful – but can you start seeing it as lines and forms, and areas of color, rather than a branch? Can you imagine where it could develop from there? There is something organically pleasing about the designs you find in nature.

That’s how I came to design my “blue agate” rug. At some point, it stopped being a picture of my agate slice, and just became a design I really liked. I would like to do another version of this general rug design, maybe in reds, oranges and yellows.

You don’t have to be an expert in drawing to look around, and play with shapes and lines, forms and colors – to create your own designs! Abstract designs might not be for everyone, but they are a great change of pace, and a good way to stretch your “creative muscle”. And don’t forget: rugs do not always have to be rectangles or circles!

Keep on hooking, and hook what you love.

One by Corot

By | Art, Composition, History of Art | One Comment

We have not looked at much art history lately, so here is a very nice painting I came across yesterday. Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot painted this work in 1851, and it was sold last week at Sotheby’s in London. It is titled La Rochelle: L’Abreuvoir (Watering hole) View taken near the Ramparts, with the Tower of the Lantern.

Does this painting have to do with rughooking? Well, let’s just say that if you spend a little time looking at it, you will absorb the evidence of good composition and design.

Take a look at how Corot created balance in his composition. There is a row of large trees on the left. What balances them out, on the right? How does your eye travel around the canvas, and what leads your eye? And though he painted from an actual (chosen) view of La Rochelle, why do you suppose he placed the figures of the woman and the man on the horse just where he did? Look, too, at the quite limited range of colors he used – virtually no bright colors at all… and that lovely sky! How does he give structure to the sky that enhances the balance of the view below?

I always like to look, when considering a painting, at where all the horizontal lines are, where the verticals and diagonals are, where the curves are.

There is only one master here – Corot. We are nothing compared to him, nothing.” – Claude Monet, 1897

He is still the strongest, he anticipated everything …” – Edgar Degas, 1883

Corot (1796-1875), a native of Paris, was considered a master of Romantic landscapes, but is credited with being a progenitor of Impressionism. His method of painting en plein air (painting in the outdoors, from the actual scene) drew the interest of much younger artists – Renoir, Monet, Degas and Pissarro, all of whom either experimented with Corot’s technique or called themselves his “pupils.” He anticipated the plein-air innovations of Impressionism.

M. Corot has a remarkable quality that has eluded most of our artists today: he knows how to invent. His point of departure is always nature, but when he arrives at the interpretation of it, he no longer copies, he remembers it”. (Du Camp, 1864)

Several decades later, Impressionism would revolutionize art by taking a similar approach — quick, spontaneous painting done in the out-of-doors; but where the Impressionists used rapidly applied, un-mixed colors to capture light and mood, Corot usually mixed and blended his colors to get his dreamy effects.

Corot studied in France and Italy. In northern Europe, the true reality of the actual landscape was considered most important to capture (the “Northern Realism” school), while in the south and Italy, landscapes were painted in an idealized, more romanticised manner. Corot learned from both schools. His notebooks reveal hundreds of precise renderings of tree trunks, rocks, and plants. He learned how to give buildings and rocks the effect of volume and solidity with proper light and shadow, and would place suitable figures in his scenes to add human context and scale, as in the painting above. He considered his best works his “souvenirs” – small, accurately rendered landscapes, but filtered through his emotional reaction to the scenes – his “memories” of the scenes.

Corot was financially independent, so unlike many painters, he could paint what he wanted. La Rochelle was painted in 1851, and, after initial rejection by the Paris art world, Corot’s reputation was established by then. The 1850s was the period when his style became softer and his colours more restricted. In his later landscapes, he employed a small range of colors, often using soft colored greys and blue-greens, with very few spots of strong color, often confined to the clothing of the human figures. Topographical detail was suppressed in favour of mood and atmosphere, above all in his ‘souvenirs’, small works like La Rochelle (which is only about 13″ x 19″), which he considered his mementos of real landscapes.

This painting was sold at Sotheby’s about two weeks ago (June 6th, sale price unstated) but the pre-sale estimate was £100,000-£200,000 (about $130,000-$190,000). This painting was oil on canvas, actual size: 13¼ in. by 18¾ in.

Towards the end of his life, Corot became an elder of the Parisian artists’ community and would use his influence to gain commissions for other artists. He was well known for his kindness and charitable gifts, with large donations to the poor of Paris, other artists, their widows and families, and support of a day care center in his Parisian neighborhood.

Notes on Corot were compiled from the National Gallery of Art, Sotheby’s, and Wikipedia. To look at all of Corot’s work, and a detailed biography, go to www.jean-baptiste-camille-corot.org.

May all your rugs be just as you like, and balanced. Hook on!

Let’s look at some old rugs!

By | Antique rugs, Composition | 7 Comments

It’s been a while since we looked at antique rugs, so let’s jump in and see what can be found in the spring auctions. Above, you see Lot 22, HOOKED RUG WITH DOUBLE CORNUCOPIA & FLORAL DESIGN (33 1/2″ X 65 1/2″) from the Gallery at Knotty Pine, in West Swansey, NH. Price estimate is $200-$300. It will be coming up for sale June 10th, at 11 am. There was no detailed description, but I like the colors, the nice fine shading, and the symmetry of the design.

And now a little side trip relating to this design: I just learned the other day, that this is an example of Point Symmetry, meaning it looks the same upside down… or from any two opposite directions, ie, from the same center point. Here’s an illustration of point symmetry:

Point Symmetry is when every part has a matching part: the same distance from the central point but in the opposite direction. You learn something new every day! Thanks to Ania Knap for this one!

Now here is Lot 77, “Hand hooked vintage rug” which is coming up for sale on June 11th at 11 am, at Denise Ryan Auction House, in Manchester, NH, with a price estimate of $100-$500:

What a sweet scene! I especially like that the maker (unknown, of course) gave plenty of room to the lake itself, confining the near and far shores to (roughly) half of the entire rug – just the feeling you get sitting near a lake, with the vast water reaching into the distance.

This one is a little different, and is coming up for sale at Schwenke Auctioneers on June 14, 2017, at 10:00 am in Woodbury, CT. It is Lot 673:

The description reads “Depicting “White Horse Tavern”. Stains. 27 1/4″ long, 38″ wide. Provenance: Property of a Woodbury CT Estate.”

Well, it is a very nice signage rug, and while it’s not something I would make, I know sign designs have become quite popular. For the right person, it would be a great choice, and the estimated price on this one is $80-$100.

And finally, in the same June 14 sale at Schwenke Auctioneers, is this wonderful rug, Lot 614:

The colors on this lovely hit or miss are so bright, I wonder how old it is, but the only description is “Striped Rug with Floral Center. Use wear, center holes. 36″ high, 40″ wide. Provenance: Property of a Woodbury CT Estate.” And the estimated price on this one is $100-$200.

All photos are shown courtesy of the auction houses. The Gallery at Knnotty Pine is online at www.knottypineantiques.com, Denise Ryan Auctions is online at www.deniseryanauction.com, and Schwenke Auctioneers is at www.woodburyauction.com.

So. Which one would you pick? For me, it would be the little lake scene, reminiscent of many happy childhood days “up at the lake”.

Two more rugs in the world!

By | Composition, Contemporary rugmakers, Making rugs | 4 Comments

Sometime along about last June, I showed you this original design created by Sarah Jansen, of Westport, MA. Sarah had been asked by her daughter to do a rug for her “with different farm animals”. What an interesting design problem – do you make one farm scene with all the animals in together, or something different?

I loved how Sarah went for “something different” – she placed the groups of different barnyard animals each in their own little tableau, but unified and tied together each scene with the flowering vine that connects them! Just a great design solution!
So I heard from Sarah the other day, and this rug is done:

Sarah said she used a #6 cut of wool for all the animals, and a #8 cut for the rest of the rug. And the red flowers and the yellow birds combine well with both the individual animal scenes and the mixed coffee colored background.

It seems to me that Sarah could sell this pattern complete with the animal scenes, or just sell it with the different tableau areas blank, for people to fill in with their own personal “scenes” – maybe of family stories, or scenes from family trips, different family homes, or their own animal friends.

And for those of you who have not already seen this on facebook, I did finish my big (for me) hit or miss rug. Here it is:

After the riot of color in the hit or miss center, the wide charcoal gray border was pretty boring to hook, all in one dark color, but I do like the width of the border, and the darkness of it, now that I am done with the hooking and can stand back for a good look.

Sarah’s rug is her own design, and protected by copyright. It is possible that her design will be available soon as a pattern to buy, so if you are interested in it, let me know and I will pass that along to her. My rug was based on an antique rug, and I re-drew it to have clusters of flowers in all four corners. If you want to use the same idea and draw it out for yourself, feel free. I can tell you that drawing the ovals, both for the inside and outside borders, was the hardest part! I finally solved that by taking an old oval cheap “wipe your feet on it” rug and tracing the borders. I was still worried about whether it would look like a true oval when done, but I steamed it after taking this photo, and it looks ok to me!

Hook on, and happy Spring!

With needle and thread

By | Art, Composition, Creativity | One Comment

We’ve been talking a lot about hooked rugs lately (of course!) but today let’s take a look at some very fine needlework. Sarah K. Benning is an American contemporary embroiderer, who lives a rather nomadic life and studio practice (primarily splitting her time between the U.S. and Spain). Above and below, you can see examples of her well-designed and detailed work with needle and thread.

Sarah’s formal training was in fine arts, but she writes that she is a self-taught embroiderer. In fact, she says she discovered her love for embroidery almost by accident, and what began as a hobby has turned into her full-time career. But her studies at the Art Institute of Chicago have their effect – her sense of strong composition and her training in illustration really show in her designs.

Her works are quite small:

And her sense of humor comes through, too, as in this piece:

Sarah wrote that each piece begins as an illustration, and then she treats her thread as if it were ink or paint, meticulously bringing her drawn design to life. She frequently forgoes traditional embroidery stitches in favor of bold shapes and playful patterns. And because drawing is at the heart of each work, she keeps a sketchbook of ideas, composition thumbnails, plant details and textile diagrams to work from.

And don’t you love how she uses interior rugs to add depth and pattern to her plant scenes? See, we are right back to talking about rugs again! OK, here is one more of Sarah’s pieces for you:

Many thanks to Sarah, whose works are all her own and protected by copyright, for giving me permission to show them here. You can see many more of her designs on her website at www.sarahkbenning.com.

In the spirit…

By | Art, Color, Composition | 6 Comments

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Here we are in December, so let’s go visit a few museums, looking for Wise Men, and for the spirit of the season.

First, a stop at the wonderful Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Here, above, is a panel from the V&A collection, Adoration of the Magi, made in Faenza, Italy, circa 1490-1500.

This is quite a small piece (about 24″ x 16″, and about 6″ deep) and I think it attracted me because there was something “rughooking-primitive” about the portrayal, and of course because of the deep, rich colors used. And the perspective of the figures, sheltering in the grotto (cave), with the landscape above, made it an intriguing composition.

It is described as “modelled in high relief in a recessed frame, and painted in blue, orange, manganese purple and copper green. The three kings are on the left, while on the right is St. Joseph and the seated Virgin Mary with Baby Jesus on her lap. The figures are depicted in a grotto, and above it, a landscape with a tree. Techniques: Tin-glazed earthenware painted with rich colors.”

Just to give you a better look at the depth of the relief, here is a sideways view of the panel:

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After that colorful version, let’s stop at the Rejksmuseum in Amsterdam to look at an engraving of Adoration of the Magi, by Dutch artist Hendrick Goltzius, a century later (about 1598-1600):

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Interesting because it is unfinished, yes, but also because it is so personal – the focus here is not the entire manger scene with a small crowd of people and animals, but the emotions on four faces, as they gaze upon the still-missing Christ child by candlelight.

And when you look at the fine lines of an engraving, you can see so clearly how the lines and crosshatching create dark, medium and light areas, and how the direction of the lines and curves create the folds in the clothing, the shape of the fingers, the curls in the hair. Here is a close-up for you:

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And here is one more, and very different, Adoration of the Magi, by Pieter Brueghel II, (Dutch, 1590-1638), also from the Rejksmuseum:

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Now this is almost the opposite of the Goltzius etching – here the entire town is portrayed, and the nativity scene is almost completely hidden in the bottom left corner. And the more I looked at this, the more I liked this odd composition – for as this holiest of events was happening, only a few were aware of it at all, and the majority of people were going about their daily business, completely unaware. There may have been Wise Men bearing gifts, but in no version of the Christian Nativity story were there a lot of them.

You can browse through collections at both these museums quite easily. The V&A is online here and the English-language site of the Rejksmuseum is online here.

The run-up to Christmas can be rushed, but we only are given a set number of Christmases in our lives, so do your best to make all of your preparations – whether making cookies, hooking an ornament, buying gifts, or finishing the tree – mindful and joyful.

Lynda’s “Legacy Rug”

By | Composition, Contemporary rugmakers, Creativity | 4 Comments

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Here is a beautiful rug created and hooked by Lynda Hadlock, of Manchester, NH. Lynda’s Grandfather Scaletti had come to America from Italy, and he was a skilled stone carver, who went to work in the Redstone, NH granite quarry.

Linda writes, “My Grandfather was a stone cutter and I wanted to create a family legacy rug. We had a granite cornice stone that he helped carve – it was broken and could not be used, but I still have it in my garden:”

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Pam Bartlett (owner and hooking teacher at The Woolen Pear, in Loudon, NH) was instrumental in helping me turn my idea into reality. We used the arch as a window, and envisioned my grandfather looking out to his future and seeing Redstone NH and the quarry. Here is the photo I took of the scene in Redstone:

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It was a challenge to get the wool to look like granite, I wanted to get a tromp l’oeil look.”

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Lynda wrote that perspective was also important. Look at how she used angled lines of hooking on the bottom and side edges of the arch to add depth to it:

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Wow, that is really effective. Even her grandfather’s name really looks like it is carved in stone, because of the way Lynda used her shading:

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The quarries in Redstone are a wonderful part of NH history. Redstone (now part of Conway, NH) produced two different rare colors of granite: red and green. Granite from Redstone was used in most of the early Maine Central and Boston & Maine railroad stations, and to make paving stones for cities all over the country. Redstone granite was used in many buildings in Portland, Boston, New York, and Washington, D.C. and as far away as Denver, CO and Havana, Cuba. Here is a photo of the stone yard and shed, in 1909:

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The Hatch Memorial Shell, in Boston, is of Redstone green granite. Grant’s Tomb in New York, the National Archives building in Washington, and the George Washington Memorial Masonic Temple in Alexandria, V.A. were built mostly of Redstone pink granite. Supplying granite for the Masonic Temple was the largest job ever undertaken, including twenty-four polished columns, each 22 feet long and each weighing 18 tons. Historical documents about the quarries talk about the skilled Italian stonecutters who came to work to do fine detailing and carving, and settled in the area with their families. The Nature Conservancy and the State of New Hampshire now own the entire property.

What a wonderful piece of family history to memorialize in a rug! Lynda, I know parts of this design were a real challenge, and it is clear you brought all your skills to this rug. It’s a beautiful achievement, and a great legacy rug for your family! Thanks so much for sharing it with us!

Lynda’s rug is her own, copyrighted and protected, and used here with her kind permission. Please don’t copy, pin, facebook or paste it…unless you ask her.

Antique rugs on the block

By | Antique rugs, Composition | 2 Comments

image Garth's

A beautiful Sunday! Maybe you have time to read a blog entry, and maybe you are busy hooking or out enjoying the late September sunshine. But whenever you get to this, let’s look at a few antique rugs. All these rugs are coming up for sale (or just got sold) at auction. Above you can see Lot 1250A: TWO FOLKSY RUGS, from Garth’s Auctioneers, (Oct. 7, 1 pm) in Delaware, Ohio. Both have great colors. Here is the auctioneer’s description:
American, 1st quarter-20th century. Penny rug with pointed ends in red, gold, green, grey, etc., 33″ x 50″, and a hooked rug with flowers, 20″ x 50″. Estimate: $100 – $200.

Here is another great antique rug sold by Garth’s on Sept.10th:

image Garth's

Oh, boy… this is my favorite kind of antique rug. Clearly drawn in the most primitive style, capturing what seem to be beloved dogs, with that patchy look that signals (to me) that the hooker just used the materials she had on hand. And the hit-or-miss sections are great! This was described as: AMERICAN FOLKSY HOOKED RUG. Early 20th century. Rug has hearts, stars, horseshoe, and dogs, “Bob” and “Rose”. 27″h. 64″w. Sorry, it does not say what the sale price was.

Here is a hooked rug up for sale on Oct 2 (11 am) by Jenack Auctioneers, in Chester, NY. It is just described as: Lot 336, VINTAGE “PIG” HOOKED RUG. 23 X 34″. Estimate: $50-$100. Notice how the checkerboard red border color draws your eye to the pig’s red nose…

image Jennack Auctioneers

Here is another, well, let’s say “unique” rug, sold by Kaminski Auctions in Glocester, MA back on Sept. 17th. No info on it, but worth seeing – rughookers do have a sense of humor!

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Finally, I saw this painting in the Oct. 29 (1 pm) auction at Bakker Auctions, Provincetown, MA:

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Lot 18: NICOLETTA POLI (1958-2014), Hooked Rug, 1996, Oil on canvas. Estimate: $800-$1,200.

What first interested me about this painting was that it is so clearly a braided rug, not a “hooked” rug! But the more I looked at it, I was impressed by the perspective the artist used. I would tend (if planning out such a design) to do a straight-on sketch of the dog laying on the rug, but Poli used almost a bird’s eye view, and added to the composition by having the dog on the diagonal, encircled by the curves of the rug. A good example of creative composition, I think!

All photos above are used courtesy of the auction houses, and the photos gelong to them, not you or me! Garth’s is online at www.garths.com, Kaminski Auctions is online at www.kaminskiauctions.com, and Bakker Auctions is online at www.bakkerproject.com. Janack Auctions is online at www.jenack.com.

Hope you get to hook a little today!